Housing Resources for Seniors

Housing for 55 Plus in Saskatoon and area

Housing for Older Adults – All the Options Under the Sun

This article was originally published in the Winter 2013 issue of Coming of Age newsletter. The article provides an overview of housing options as well as a guide to locating and selecting housing for older adults. Gwen Schmidt, Outreach Coordinator, Saskatoon Public Library (revised by Shannon Swekla, 2017)

Housing Guides and Directories

Enriched Housing List – Urban

Long Term Care Homes

Long Term Care homes (also called nursing homes) provide care when your needs can no longer be met in the community. Special care homes are run by your health region or operated by a provider that has a contract with your health region. More information

Personal Care Homes – Saskatoon and region


Saskatoon and Region Personal Care Home Association


Community Care Program Support
(306) 787 – 7239
info@health.gov.sk.c

Life Lease Housing for Seniors

“Available in select Saskatchewan communities, the Life Lease Program offers moderate-income seniors with the opportunity to live in an affordable apartment-style home, in exchange for a deposit and a monthly occupancy fee.” More information

Housing for People living with Dementia

Housing Options for People Living with Dementia Volume 1: Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation

Housing Options for People Living with Dementia Volume 2: Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation

Renting

Rental Housing for People with low incomes

Legal Rights in Independent Living: A Guide to Understanding Your Rights Under the Residential Tenancies Act, 2006 and the Saskatchewan Human Rights Code
Developed by Taylor Schlamp and Bridget Morrison for the Saskatoon Council on Aging
Disclaimer: This pamphlet provides information about your rental rights. It is not a substitute for legal advice.

Renters of Saskatoon and Area (ROSA) is a community group of renters and their allies. We focus on the needs of low income renters but welcome all those who face or care about rental housing issues. ROSE is sharing our updated COVID Renter Community Support Contact resource list, to help reach and support renters. We would welcome SCOA sharing this resource both offline and online if possible, in this time of greater safety and affordability. Find them on Facebook

Government of Saskatchewan publications: Renting

Housing Agencies

Saskatoon Housing Authority

Saskatoon Housing Authority (SHA) – 306.668.2727
There are three types of housing provided: Social (Income-Based Rent), Affordable (Fixed Rent) and Life-Interest Lease. Although each program has specific eligibility criteria, housing is targeted to households whose income is too low to obtain accommodations in the private market without spending more than 30% of household income on housing costs.

24 Hrs. Emergency Maintenance Services: 306.668.2727

Saskatoon Housing Initiatives Partnership (SHIP)

The Saskatoon Housing Initiatives Partnership is a community-based non-profit organization that provides leadership to foster creative and affordable housing solutions in Saskatoon.Saskatoon Housing Initiatives Partnership (SHIP) – 306.979.6707 

Housing Resources

The Saskatchewan Housing Corporation (SHC ) – 1-800.667.7567
Programs include social and affordable rental housing, home renovations, repairs and energy retrofit programs, home adaptations programs, supports to independent living for seniors, and homeownership options. 

Seniors Property Tax Deferral Program – City of Saskatoon Revenue Branch – 306.975.2400 or 1.800.667.9944
The program is available to low-income senior citizens who own a single family home, townhouse, or apartment condominium in Saskatoon.

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation: Maintaining Senior’s independence through home adaptation – self assessment guide

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation: Housing and finance tips for Seniors

 Aging in Place Resources

CMHC Canada: Aging in Place Success Stories
The B.C.-based SAFERhome Standards Society is turning that assumption on its head by proving that universally designed homes not only cost about the same as a conventional home, they also look better, are worth more—and can appeal to a much larger market of potential buyers.